Adirondack Winter Hike Up Blue Mountain

Blue Mt, located in the geographic center of the Adirondacks, towers as a giant hulk over it’s namesake lake, a beautiful body of water speckled with wooded islands.  The mountain stands at 3750′ in elevation, only a couple of hundred feet shy of a High Peak. The trail to the summit is 2 miles long and a popular destination for summer tourists. I, however, prefer to climb old Blue in the winter, it’s far less crowded and the winter wonderworld above 3000′ is something to behold.

The snow at the upper elevations in the Adirondacks is measured in feet rather than inches. The spruce-fir forest that survives this lofty habitat is caked in snow, to the point where the trees take on otherworldly, eerie shapes.  This white world is dense and claustrophobic, total and utter silence envelopes the intruder. Even wildlife, with the exception of the snowshoe hare, has left for more pleasant territory. This frozen landscape is harsh and wildly spectacular.

Steadily climbing from the trailhead, the summit is gained in an hour more or less. To enjoy the view one must climb the firetower, which does not escape the grip of snow and ice.  From the tower the Adirondack Wilderness spreads out in every direction, with the High Peaks dominating the skyline to the north, Tirrell Pond at the foot of the mountain to the east, the Blue Ridge and West Canada Wildernesses to the south, and Blue Mt Lake, the Eckford Chain, and Raquette to the west. It’s a breathtaking and rugged scene in which I never cease to be amazed at the immensity of it all.

Although likely not to happen, come prepared in case of accident or sudden inclement weather. Snowshoes on the feet are a good idea. A pack loaded with water, food,  flashlight, space blanket, first aid kit, and an extra sweater is good insurance. Come and enjoy, this winter wonderworld offers an experience you won’t soon forget.

Fishing in the Adirondacks

With more than 3,000 fresh water lakes, ponds, brooks and streams, the Adirondacks are a favorite among avid fishermen. The region is home to 80 species of fish, including bass, trout, walleye, pike, perch and salmon. From ice fishing and fly fishing to reeling in the big one on your boat, the Adirondacks offer sportsmen an abundance of year-round opportunities to cast a line.

For some of the best fishing on the East Coast, check out these prime Adirondack fishing spots.

Fishing in Lake George Lake George
At just over 30 miles long and an average depth of 70 feet, Lake George is home to some of the best landlocked salmon and lake trout in the Northeast. You’ll also find bass, perch, chain pickerel and northern pike.

Planning a visit to Lake George? View our Lake George Itinerary for great weekend ideas!

Lake Champlain
The third largest lake in New York State, Lake Champlain consistently rates among the top fishing spots in the nation. A popular destination for lake trout and landlocked salmon, the lake also hosts a number of bass fishing tournaments every year.

Great Sacandaga Lake
From 1940-1979, Great Sacandaga Lake held the world record for the largest northern pike, and the species can still be found their today. The lake is also a popular fishing spot for bass, bullhead, yellow perch, and New York’s most valued sportfish, the walleye.

Sacandaga River
Located at the southern tip of the Adirondack Park, the Sacandaga River is one of the area’s most fertile trout hatcheries. Heavily stocked with brown trout in the section between Wells and Speculator NY, the river’s west branch is a favorite among brook and brown trout anglers alike.

Ausable River
An angler’s paradise, Ausable River is one of the best trout rivers in the Northeast, and features both brown and rainbow trout species. Located in the Whiteface Region, the river hosts the annual Ausable Two-Fly Challenge in the village of Wilmington NY.

Long Lake
Although Long Lake is home to bullheads, bass and yellow perch, its real draw is the northern pike. Anglers are eager to catch one of the rare 15 pound fish that inhabit the lake, but are more likely to pull out a pike averaging 22-28 inches.

Racquette Lake
The biggest lake trout in New York State was caught at Racquette Lake in 2009, and the promise of a prize-winning catch continue to draw fisherman to the lake today. While both lake and brook trout can be found in the river’s northern end, small and largemouth bass dominate the southern portion.

Adirondack Mt Land offers NY Mountain Properties that would put an avid fisherman in the midst of this fishing paradise. Whether you’re looking to live here year round, or are interested in a fishing cabin for seasonal adventures, we have the land options for you. We encourage you to browse our properties and then contact us for more information!

Click for more information on the Lakes of the Adirondacks.